Best Easy reads for Naturalists

For those new to learning about the natural world some of the books out there can seem a daunting place full of complicated concepts and hefty jargon. These books give a delightful view of the natural world whilst also being digestible and fun to read.

 

A Year in the Woods – Colin Elfordcover.jpg.rendition.242.374.png

A year in the woods describes just that, through the words of Colin Elford, a forest ranger from Dorset, you experience the changing of the seasons and how nature responds, the short entries are nothing short of magical, despite the regular doses of reality shared by any ranger. Elford responds to these subtle shifts over the months by conjuring up images that leave you both humbled by nature, and eager to get out into the forests to look for the subtle signs of the seasons. This book is a superb read for anyone who wishes to work in habitat management or conservation as Elford battles against the unabated deer  population.With his short tales shows the reality of Britain’s environmental legislation whilst not leaving the reader cold.

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Feral – Geroge Monbiot51xJezFSBjL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Monbiots Feral provides insight into the natural world through his impassioned tales on the need for a rewilding of Britain’s habitats, but also of the people’s relationship with the wild. Provides gorgeous descriptions of how by emerging yourself into nature you can be rewarded by some of the greatest spectacles in nature. Monbiot manages to turn the drab world of agricultural grants into a politic rally against a broken system, and leaves you ready to act to restore the diversity of the British Isles. Upon completing this book I wished for nothing more than to get out there and read straight to the coast to experience the world Monbiot delivers in this book.

 

The New Wild – Fred Pearce516oBThi+9L._SX329_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

The new wild is a refreshing view on the future of the nature that will inhabit our shores. Whilst not shying away from the reality of extinction crisis and invasive species, Pearce is able to turn this into a tale of resilience and endurance of nature. Too often books on such topics leave the reader terrified about humans effect on the planet. But the new wild will keep you grounded whilst also allowing you the gift of hope. Hope that whilst the worlds species, as we know them, may be beyond saving nature itself is constant and will continue to flow and adapt long after we are gone. A superb insight and possibly a book that will considered one of the great conservation texts decades from now.

 

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